Dentist Blog

Posts for: September, 2015

By Northside Family Dentistry
September 21, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  
SleepinginDenturesDontDoIt

Maybe you don’t like to be without teeth — ever. Or maybe you get a little forgetful sometimes. Whatever the reason, if you’re wearing your dentures to bed at night, we have one message for you: Please stop!

Sleeping in dentures can have serious health consequences. A recent study published in the Journal of Dental Research found that nursing home residents who wore their dentures to sleep were 2.3 times more likely to be hospitalized or even die of pneumonia as those who did not sleep in dentures. But how can wearing dentures at night more than double your chances of getting a lung infection?

As the study noted, pneumonia-causing bacteria can readily be moved from the mouth to the lungs simply by breathing. And dentures that are not removed at night can become breeding grounds for all kind of bacteria and fungi (such as yeast). That’s what makes them potentially dangerous.

Another condition often seen in people who wear upper dentures continually is called denture stomatitis, which is characterized by a red, inflamed palate (roof of the mouth) that has been infected with yeast. The yeast microorganisms can also infect cracked corners of the mouth, a condition known as angular cheilitis. Moreover, it has also been shown that people who sleep in dentures have higher blood levels of a protein called interleukin 6, which indicates that the body is fighting an infection. Need we go on?

Wearing dentures is supposed to improve your quality of life, not reduce it. So promote good health by taking your dentures out at night, and sticking to a good daily oral hygiene routine:

  • Remove and rinse your dentures after every meal.
  • Brush your dentures at least once a day with a soft toothbrush or denture brush and dish soap, liquid antibacterial soap, or denture cleanser (but don’t use toothpaste — it is too abrasive).
  • Store your dentures in water or a solution made for this purpose.
  • Brush your gums and tongue every day with a soft toothbrush (not the same one you clean your dentures with).
  • Rinse your dentures in clean water before you put them back in your mouth.

If you would like any more information on dentures and oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Northside Family Dentistry
September 17, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: braces  

BracesDo your child's crooked, gapped or crowded teeth lead you to believe that he or she will likely need braces in the near future? If so, the right time to visit your dentist at Northside Family Dentistry in Macon, GA may be sooner than you think. Dentists such as Clinton M. Watson, D.D.S, M.B.A and Nicole L. Jackson, D.D.S are seeing children for braces consultations earlier and earlier these days, and you won't want to make your child wait for treatment longer than you should.

Initial Consultation

Many parents are surprised to learn that the American Association for Orthodontics recommends that all children visit their dentist for a braces consultation by the age of seven, even if the child is not showing signs that braces are necessary.

While some cases are obvious, others are more subtle, and only your child's dentist can let you know for sure if braces will be needed. The sooner your child is assessed, the sooner both you and your child's dentist can begin discussing the treatment plan that will be right for your family.

Getting Braces for the First Time

Just because your child visits a Macon, GA dentist by age seven doesn't mean that he or she will start treatment that young, though it is a possibility. Instead, you will need to discuss your child's unique case with either Dr. Watson or Dr. Jackson at Northside Family Dentistry to find out when the best time to begin treatment will be.

Depending on the severity of the case, your doctor's preferences and your family's preferences, treatment may begin anytime between age seven and the teen years. Generally, most children begin treatment around the time most of their baby teeth have fallen out and their permanent teeth have come in.

Whether your child's teeth are obviously in need to treatment or you'd just like to learn more so you can prepare in advance, bringing your child in to see a dentist at Northside Family Dentistry in Macon, GA is the best way to find out more about what to expect. If your child is seven or will be soon, call and schedule an appointment today.


By Northside Family Dentistry
September 13, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”