Dentist Blog

Posts for tag: dentures

By NORTHSIDE FAMILY DENTISTRY
February 21, 2020
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: dentures  

Struggling with tooth loss? Here at Northside Family Dentistry in Macon, GA, your dentist, Dr. Clinton Watson, offers dentures as one solution for teeth replacement, with both full and partial options. Let us help you decide if dentures are the right choice for you.

How do dentures work?

Dentures are designed to fit over the bone ridge that supports natural teeth. The base, which comes in a natural pink color to resemble natural gums, stays in place through suction. The artificial teeth attached to the base are fashioned to look realistic and attractive while also being fully functional for chewing and biting.

What are the benefits of dentures?

In addition to aesthetically enhancing your smile, dentures can improve both your oral and whole-body health. After all, when teeth are missing, the mouth loses valuable support that keeps the face from drooping. Additionally, a loss of teeth can mean you are missing out on valuable nutrients found in healthy, crunchy foods like apples and carrots.

Depending on how many teeth you are missing, your dentist can fit you with partial or full dentures, including an extra-secure full denture option that uses dental implants to prevent any shifting.

Are dentures comfortable?

Because most dentures are designed to be removed for sleeping and cleaning, you may find them awkward to wear at first, with some movement within your mouth and perhaps minor impairments to your speech or eating. Fortunately, as you grow accustomed to your dentures, you should find them to be both pleasant to wear and well-functioning. During an appointment at our Macon, GA, office your dentist will take care to make sure your dentures fit snuggly yet comfortably and are serving your dental needs.

Need dental care? Give us a call

If you are suffering from tooth loss, make an appointment at our Macon, GA office today by dialing (478) 475-1976.

By Northside Family Dentistry
January 03, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
UsePartialDenturesWiselytoProtectYourFutureOralHealth

Dentures, removable restorations for missing teeth and gum tissue, can take a number of different forms, but are usually of two different types: complete and partial. A complete denture replaces all the teeth in a given arch. A removable partial denture (RPD), on the other hand, replaces several missing teeth while using the remaining teeth as support.

A common type of RPD formed of plastic is known as a “flipper” because it’s lightweight enough to be “flipped out” or moved around with the tongue. They serve an important purpose as a temporary appliance for use between periodontal treatment, implant placement and similar treatments before obtaining a more permanent restoration. In fact, they’re often referred to as “transitional” RPDs because they’re not designed for permanent tooth replacement.

Because of their low cost relative to other restorations, however, they often become the permanent choice for many people. While a well-constructed, properly fitting RPD in a healthy mouth can be an affordable alternative for people on modest budgets, their long-term use may increase the risk of dental disease and accelerated bone loss. Decades of research verify that people who permanently wear RPDs encounter more tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease than non-wearers.

This is because the attachment points of a plastic RPD to remaining teeth increases bacterial growth, which can cause both tooth decay and gum disease. This doesn’t only endanger the survival of the remaining teeth, it can lead to bone loss that will affect the RPD’s fit.

While the better course is to consider RPDs as a stepping stone to dental implants or a fixed bridge, there’s an intermediary RPD constructed of cast vitallium or gold alloy that could be considered a permanent choice. These are even lighter weight than plastic and less obtrusive in their attachments in the mouth, which can reduce plaque stagnation and promote a better oral environment.

Regardless of your choice in dentures, it’s always important to maintain good consistent oral hygiene with daily brushing and flossing and semi-annual professional cleanings and checkups. Keeping a healthy mouth will help reduce your risk of dental disease and increase your satisfaction with your denture of choice.

If you would like more information on RPDs and other denture restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Partial Dentures.”

By NORTHSIDE FAMILY DENTISTRY
June 20, 2019
Category: Dental Appliances
Tags: dentures  

Find out what type of dentures could give you back that full smile again.

Tooth loss is something that happens to millions of Americans. If this is something you’re dealing with then the most important thing you denturecan do is to turn to a dentist who can restore your smile after tooth loss. Our Macon, GA, dentists Dr. Clinton Watson and Dr. Nicole Jackson have helped countless patients get complete smiles again. If you’re looking for a fast, simple way to replace missing teeth then chances are you’re considering dentures.

 

What are dentures?

Dentures are an oral prosthetic that is designed to replace several teeth or even a full row of missing teeth. The severity of your tooth loss will determine which type of dentures is right for you. Dentures are either removable or fixed in place.

 

What are the different types of dentures?

The two main types of dentures are full and partial dentures, which are both removable. From the names alone you can probably surmise when they are used. Full dentures are used to replace the upper and lower teeth and are only used when there are no natural teeth left. Full dentures sit right on top of the gums where they stay in place through natural suction with the tissue.

Partial dentures are recommended if you need to replace one or more natural teeth but you still have some healthy teeth remaining. Partial dentures can either be removable or fixed in place. Removable partial dentures contain clasps, which will be attached to surrounding healthy teeth to hold the false teeth in place. Fixed partial dentures (sometimes referred to as dental bridges) will require our Macon, GA, general dentist to place dental crowns over healthy teeth to stabilize the dental bridge.

Along with full and partial dentures, you also have immediate and implant-supported dentures. If you have to undergo a tooth extraction, immediate dentures will be placed on the same day as your extraction so you won’t have to go without teeth while your gums heal (the healing process can take up to 12 weeks). Immediate dentures are considered temporary dentures and give patients immediate teeth to use until their long-term dentures are ready to be fitted.

Patients who have a healthy jawbone may also choose to get dental implants. These implants can be placed inside the jawbone and provide a permanent foundation from which to hold dentures in place. This is a great option for patients who have full upper dentures, which can be more challenging to keep in place when speaking or chewing. Implants ensure that your dentures don’t shift or move.

Want to find out if dentures can give you back the smile you’ve been looking for despite tooth loss? Then it’s time to turn to the dental experts at Northside Family Dentistry in Macon, GA, for a con

By Northside Family Dentistry
January 28, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
QuizTestYourKnowledgeonDentures

Since as many as 26 percent of older U.S. adults have lost all their teeth, there are a large number Americans who wear full removable dentures, also known as false teeth. You may be one of them.

How much do you know about dentures? See if you can answer the following questions connected with lost teeth and dentures.

  1. Which word refers to the loss of all permanent teeth?
    1. Atrophy
    2. Prosthetic
    3. Edentulism
    4. Periodontal
  2. What is the name given to the bone that surrounds, supports, and connects to your teeth?
    1. Periodontal
    2. Metacarpal
    3. Tibia
    4. Alveolar
  3. What tissue attaches the teeth to the bone that supports your teeth?
    1. Periodontal Ligament
    2. Periodontal Muscle
    3. Parietal Ligament
    4. Achilles Tendon
  4. When a person loses teeth, the stimulus that keeps the underlying bone healthy is also lost, and the bone resorbs or melts away. Pressure transmitted by dentures through the gums to the bone can accentuate this process, which is called
    1. Dystrophy
    2. Atrophy
    3. Hypertrophy
    4. None of the above
  5. A device that replaces a missing body part such as an arm or leg, eye, tooth or teeth is referred to as
    1. Robotic
    2. Imaginary
    3. Exotic
    4. Prosthetic
  6. When teeth have to be extracted, bone loss can be minimized by bone grafting. Bone grafting materials are usually a sterile powdered form of
    1. Allograft (human tissue)
    2. Xenograft (animal tissue)
    3. Both
    4. Neither
  7. Wearers of full dentures must re-learn to manipulate the jaw joints, ligaments, nerves, and muscles to work differently in order to speak, bite, and chew. The name for this system of interconnected body mechanisms, originating with the root words for “mouth” and “jaw,” is
    1. Boca biting
    2. Stomatognathic
    3. Periodontal
    4. None of the above
  8. A type of plastic that is artistically formed and colored to make prosthetic teeth and gums look natural is called
    1. methyl methacrylate
    2. beta barbital
    3. rayon
    4. polystyrene
  9. Success in denture wearing depends on
    1. The skill of the dentist
    2. The talent of the laboratory technician
    3. The willing collaboration of the patient
    4. All of the above

Answers: 1c, 2d, 3a, 4b, 5d, 6c, 7b, 8a, 9d. How well did you do? If you have additional questions about full removable dentures, don’t hesitate to ask us.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about dentures. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Removable Full Dentures.”

By Northside Family Dentistry
October 30, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
TheresaLotofEffortBehindtheScenestoMakingDenturesWorkforYou

For centuries, people who've lost all their teeth have worn dentures. Although materials in today's dentures are more durable and attractive than those in past generations, the basic design remains the same — prosthetic (false) teeth set in a plastic or resin base made to resemble gum tissue.

If you're thinking of obtaining dentures, don't let their simplicity deceive you: a successful outcome depends on a high degree of planning and attention to detail customized to your mouth.

Our first step is to determine the best positioning for the prosthetic teeth. It's not an “eyeball” guess — we make a number of calculations based on the shape and size of your jaws and facial features to determine the best settings within the resin base. These calculations help us answer a few important questions for determining design: how large should the teeth be? How far forward or back from the lip? How much space between the upper and lower teeth when the jaws are at rest?

We also can't forget about the artificial gums created by the base. How much your gums show when you smile depends a lot on how much your upper lip rises. We must adjust the base size to accommodate your upper lip rise so that the most attractive amount of gum shows when you smile. We also want to match as close as possible the color and texture of your natural gum tissues.

There's one other important aspect to manage: how your upper and lower dentures function together when you eat or speak. This means we must also factor your bite into the overall denture design. This may even continue after your dentures arrive: we may still need to adjust them while in your mouth to improve function and comfort.

Ill-fitting, dysfunctional and unattractive dentures can be distressing and embarrassing. But with careful planning and customization, we can help ensure your new dentures are attractive and comfortable to wear now and for years to come.

If you would like more information on removable dentures for teeth replacement, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Removable Full Dentures.”